Flaming diamond

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alvydas
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Flaming diamond

Post by alvydas » Tue Dec 14, 2010 10:31 am

I have long tried to do it with Kerkythea. Failed lighting accuracy. But I get such a colorful light refraction succeeded only with Twilight. Extract caustic with the first attempt failed. Adjusting the light was able to do it nicely. But anyway this is a difficult task :!
Attachments
dia.jpg
dia.jpg (303.22 KiB) Viewed 8088 times
originalimg.jpg
originalimg.jpg (543.66 KiB) Viewed 7425 times
diamondref.jpg
diamondref.jpg (144.09 KiB) Viewed 7425 times

pdwyer
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by pdwyer » Tue Dec 14, 2010 1:11 pm

Nice!

I was playing with dispersion effects too recently but didn't get anything nice like this.
Are the materials from the library or templates?
Edit: Also, was it an easy 9, 10 or one of the tech progressives?

Fletch
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by Fletch » Tue Dec 14, 2010 1:47 pm

Use Easy10 with Spotlights. Easy09 with light emitting materials.
There is a perfect diamond material in the Twilight Gems Material Library.
Lighting is always "fun" when doing this type of rendering. (it will be a lot of trial and error)

Fletch
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by Fletch » Tue Dec 14, 2010 1:49 pm

ps.
looking at real photos of real diamond rings helps to give a more realistic understanding of what you should look for / expect in rendering diamonds.

pss
it requires a perfectly accurate model. :!: :!: :!:
see also a link I placed in tips and tricks section - jewelry photo tips

alvydas
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by alvydas » Tue Dec 14, 2010 2:35 pm

Diamonds advertising made without dispersion. It is very important for photographers, the rays did not leave the diamond. They need to keep a light inside the diamond. :halo:

A short guide on how to obtain dispersion :totgm:
Attachments
dispersion.jpg
dispersion.jpg (558.35 KiB) Viewed 7363 times

sauronblue
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by sauronblue » Thu Jan 23, 2014 5:14 pm

alvydas wrote:Diamonds advertising made without dispersion. It is very important for photographers, the rays did not leave the diamond. They need to keep a light inside the diamond. :halo:

A short guide on how to obtain dispersion :totgm:
I'm so far from tackling diamond refraction, but maybe this will help me with simple lights. your pics show the beam of light, illustrating exactly how it will strike the diamond, so you can gauge the refraction/reflection. I can never tell what's going to be in the beam of light until I render the image. Am I missing a step, or are you revealing what is unseen simply to illustrate- and if so, how do you gauge your lighting so accurately that you can strike the corner of a diamond ring without creating a spotlight circle on the table next to it?
thx for any insight, I know this thread is old

Fletch
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by Fletch » Thu Jan 23, 2014 6:14 pm

You can change any spotlight paramaters in the Light Editor dialog.
Insert a spot light, and change the hotspot to 1 and the falloff to 1 or 2, and you will have a very tight beam.

In TWL v2 you will be able to see a preview of the spotlight, just like you see previews of materials when working with them.
Subject: Diagram of a Spotlight
Fletch wrote:This diagram is to help a beginner understand what all those numbers mean for their Twilight Spotlight.
Image

Things to remember when laying out lights in Twilight Render Plugin for SketchUp:
  • For a space between 8-9 feet tall (about 2-2.5 meters) assuming that a spotlight of power of "1" is a 100 watt light bulb is a good place to start.
  • Spacing your light fixtures out to match how you would do so in real life is essential.
  • Loading an IES data file for a Can Downlight into your spotlight inside of a can downlight in your model is the fastest way to get great-looking lighting.
  • Remember that the default color of the light source (even IES files) is always white, so setting the correct color for your light source is essential for realistic results.
Color of Lights / Light Render Speed Comparison
See also: Lights - render times...
& Lighting Made Simple

alvydas
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by alvydas » Thu Jan 23, 2014 7:42 pm

scene for testing
Attachments
DiaScene.zip
(35.54 KiB) Downloaded 213 times
diam.jpg
diam.jpg (207.83 KiB) Viewed 6371 times

Jpalm
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by Jpalm » Fri Jan 24, 2014 2:32 pm

Relly informative guys.
Really like those renders.

Fletch
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Re: Flaming diamond

Post by Fletch » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:36 pm

Updated file for SU2020/latest Twilight.

Download and load the HDR from here! (Studio-2StraightEmitters-BlackSky.hdr)
Attachments
DiaScene.skp
for SU 2020
(267.46 KiB) Downloaded 52 times
diamond2-twl2.jpg
diamond2-twl2.jpg (370.39 KiB) Viewed 1765 times

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